Zacarias Moussaoui canada géna usa

Profile: Zacarias Moussaoui

Zacarias Moussaoui was a participant or observer in the following events:

Page 1 of 2 (147 events) previous | 1 , 2 | next

March 9, 1953: Supreme Court Creates ‘State Secrets’ Privilege in Ruling

Chief Justice Fred Vinson. Chief Justice Fred Vinson. [Source: Kansas State Historical Society] The US Supreme Court upholds the power of the federal government’s executive branch to withhold documents from a civil suit on the basis of executive privilege and national security (see October 25, 1952). The case, US v Reynolds , overturns an appellate court decision that found against the government (see December 11, 1951). Originally split 5-4 on the decision, the Court goes to 6-3 when Justice William O. Douglas joins the majority. The three dissenters, Justices Hugo Black, Felix Frankfurter, and Robert Jackson, refuse to write a dissenting opinion, instead adopting the decision of the appellate court as their dissent.
'State Secrets' a Valid Reason for Keeping Documents out of Judicial, Public Eye - Chief Justice Fred Vinson writes the majority opinion. Vinson refuses to grant the executive branch the near-unlimited power to withhold documents from judicial review, as the government’s arguments before the court implied (see October 21, 1952), but instead finds what he calls a “narrower ground for defense” in the Tort Claims Act, which compels the production of documents before a court only if they are designated “not privileged.” The government’s claim of privilege in the Reynolds case was valid, Vinson writes. But the ruling goes farther; Vinson upholds the claim of “state secrets” as a reason for withholding documents from judicial review or public scrutiny. In 2008, author Barry Siegel will write: “In truth, only now was the Supreme Court formally recognizing the privilege, giving the government the precedent it sought, a precedent binding on all courts throughout the nation. Most important, the Court was also—for the first time—spelling out how the privilege should be applied.” Siegel will call the Reynolds ruling “an effort to weigh competing legitimate interests,” but the ruling does not allow judges to see the documents in order to make a decision about their applicability in a court case: “By instructing judges not to insist upon examining documents if the government can satisfy that ‘a reasonable danger’ to national security exists, Vinson was asking jurists to fly blind.” Siegel will mark the decision as “an act of faith. We must believe the government,” he will write, “when it claims [the accident] would reveal state secrets. We must trust that the government is telling the truth.”
Time of Heightened Tensions Drives Need for Secrecy - Vinson goes on to note, “[W]e cannot escape judicial notice that this is a time of vigorous preparation for the national defense.” Locked in the Cold War with the Soviet Union, and fighting a war in Korea, the US is, Vinson writes, in a time of crisis, and one where military secrets must be kept and even encouraged. [U. S. v. Reynolds, 3/9/1953; Siegel, 2008, pp. 171-176]
Future Ramifications - Reflecting on the decision in 2008, Siegel will write that while the case will not become as well known as many other Court decisions, it will wield significant influence. The ruling “formally recognized and established the framework for the government’s ‘state secrets’ privilege—a privilege that for decades had enabled federal agencies to conceal conduct, withhold documents, and block civil litigation, all in the name of national secrecy.… By encouraging judicial deference when the government claimed national security secrets, Reynolds had empowered the Executive Branch in myriad ways. Among other things, it had provided a fundamental legal argument for much of the Bush administration’s response to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Enemy combatants such as Yaser Esam Hamdi (see December 2001) and Jose Padilla (see June 10, 2002), for many months confined without access to lawyers, had felt the breath of Reynolds . So had the accused terrorist Zacarias Moussaoui when federal prosecutors defied a court order allowing him access to other accused terrorists (see March 22, 2005). So had the Syrian-Canadian Maher Arar (see September 26, 2002), like dozens of others the subject of a CIA extraordinary rendition to a secret foreign prison (see After September 11, 2001). So had hundreds of detainees at the US Navy Base at Guantanamo Bay, held without charges or judicial review (see September 27, 2001). So had millions of American citizens, when President Bush, without judicial knowledge or approval, authorized domestic eavesdropping by the National Security Agency (see Early 2002). US v. Reynolds made all this possible. The bedrock of national security law, it had provided a way for the Executive Branch to formalize an unprecedented power and immunity, to pull a veil of secrecy over its actions.” [Siegel, 2008, pp. ix-x]

Entity Tags: William O. Douglas, Zacarias Moussaoui, US Supreme Court, Yaser Esam Hamdi, Robert Jackson, Jose Padilla, Felix Frankfurter, Bush administration (43), Fred Vinson, Barry Siegel, George W. Bush, Hugo Black, Maher Arar

Timeline Tags: Civil Liberties

1994: French Suspect Moussaoui Involvement in Assassination; British Block Investigation

Zacarias Moussaoui obtained a master’s degree in international business from South Bank University in London in the mid-1990s. Zacarias Moussaoui obtained a master’s degree in international business from South Bank University in London in the mid-1990s. [Source: Agence France-Presse] Three French consular officials in Algeria are assassinated. A French magistrate travels to London to investigate the case. The magistrate has information that a “Zacarias” living in London was a paymaster for the assassination. Zacarias Moussaoui, born in France and of North African ancestry, had moved to London in 1992 and become involved in radical Islam after being influenced by Abu Qatada (who has been called one of the leaders of al-Qaeda in Europe). The magistrate asks British authorities for permission to interview Moussaoui and search his apartment in Brixton. The British refuse to give permission, saying the French don’t have enough evidence on Moussaoui. But the French continue to develop more information on Moussaoui from this time on. [Independent, 12/11/2001; CNN, 12/11/2001; Los Angeles Times, 12/13/2001]

Entity Tags: France, Zacarias Moussaoui, United Kingdom

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

1995-1998: French Learn of Moussaoui’s Trips to Afghanistan Training Camps, Ties to Militants

Zacarias Moussoui’s French national identification card. Zacarias Moussoui’s French national identification card. [Source: FBI] French agents believe Zacarias Moussaoui makes a trip to an al-Qaeda camp in Afghanistan in 1995. After this, he goes to Chechnya and joins Muslims radicals fighting Russian troops there. French intelligence learns of this, though when they learn it is not clear. He then attends the Khaldan al-Qaeda camp in Afghanistan around April 1998. French intelligence will apparently learn of this second trip to Afghanistan in 1999 (see 1999). [MSNBC, 12/11/2001; Independent, 12/11/2001; CBS News, 5/8/2002] The French additionally come to believe that Moussaoui had been in contact with Farid Melouk, an Algerian suspected of belonging to the GIA, an Algerian militant group. Melouk is arrested in 1998 after a shootout with police in Brussels, Belgium, and later sentenced to nine years of prison. [Guardian, 9/18/2001]

Entity Tags: Zacarias Moussaoui, Farid Melouk, France

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

1996-2001: Moussaoui Recuits Muslims to Fight in Kosovo and Chechnya

In 1996, Zacarias Moussaoui begins recruiting other young Muslims to fight for Islamic militant causes in Chechnya and Kosovo. [Time, 9/24/2001] He recruits for Chechen warlord Ibn Khattab, the Chechen leader most closely linked to al-Qaeda (see August 24, 2001). Details on his Kosovo links are still unknown. For most of this time, he is living in London and is often seen at the Finsbury Park mosque run by Abu Hamza al-Masri. For a time, Moussaoui has two French Caucasian roommates, Jerome and David Courtailler. The family of these brothers later believes that Moussaoui recruits them to become radical militants. The brothers will later be arrested for suspected roles in plotting attacks on the US embassy in Paris and NATO’s headquarters in Brussels. [Scotsman, 10/1/2001] David Courtailler will later confess that at the Finsbury Park mosque he was given cash, a fake passport, and the number of a contact in Pakistan who would take him to an al-Qaeda camp. [London Times, 1/5/2002] French intelligence later learns that one friend he recruits, Masooud Al-Benin, dies in Chechnya in 2000 (see Late 1999-Late 2000). Shortly before 9/11, Moussaoui will try to recruit his US roommate at the time, Hussein al-Attas, to fight in Chechnya. Al-Attas will also see Moussaoui frequently looking at websites about the Chechnya conflict. [Daily Oklahoman, 3/22/2006] Moussaoui also goes to Chechnya himself in 1996-1997 (see 1996-Early 1997).

Entity Tags: Abu Hamza al-Masri, Masooud Al-Benin, Hussein al-Attas, Ibn Khattab, David Courtailler, Jerome Courtailler, Zacarias Moussaoui

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline

1996-Early 1997: Moussaoui Fights with Militants in Chechnya

According to British intelligence, Zacarias Moussaoui fights in Chechnya with Islamist militants there. Using previously gained computer skills, he mostly works as an information specialist. He helps militants forge computer links and post combat pictures on radical Muslim websites. It is not known when British intelligence learns this. [USA Today, 6/14/2002] Moussaoui also helps recruit militants to go fight in Chechnya (see 1996-2001). He likely assists Chechen warlord Ibn Khattab, the Chechen leader most closely linked to al-Qaeda (see August 24, 2001).

Entity Tags: Ibn Khattab, Zacarias Moussaoui

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

Summer 1996 or Shortly After: Moussaoui Meets Future Shoe Bomber at London Mosque

Zacarias Moussaoui meets future shoe bomber Richard Reid at a south London mosque. Moussaoui, who will be arrested in the US shortly before 9/11 for raising suspicions at flight school, is the leader of the radical faction at the mosque and, according to authors Sean O’Neill and Daniel McGrory, Reid “hero-worship[s]” him. Moussaoui also “dominate[s] discussion groups…, shouting down those who dare[…] to criticize his stand that violent jihad [is] the only way to support Islamic communities around the world.” When the moderates at the mosque get together to criticize him, he moves to a more radical mosque, Finsbury Park, where he falls under surveillance by the British authorities (see March 1997-April 2000). Reid goes with him, and by this time he is “mouthing the same radical expressions and insults about America and Tony Blair as his shaven-headed hero.” [O'Neill and McGrory, 2006, pp. 219]

Entity Tags: Zacarias Moussaoui, Richard C. Reid

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline

1997: Moussaoui Travels to Azerbaijan, Meets CIA Asset There

A young Zacarias Moussaoui. A young Zacarias Moussaoui. [Source: Corbis] Zacarias Moussaoui travels to Baku, Azerbaijan. It is not known why he is there, but Baku is often a staging area for people attempting to go to nearby Chechnya, and there is an important al-Qaeda/Islamic Jihad cell there at the time (see Late August 1998). He meets a CIA informer there, but the informer does not learn Moussaoui’s real name, and does not report on Moussaoui to the CIA until April 2001 (see April 2001). [Tenet, 2007, pp. 201]

Entity Tags: Zacarias Moussaoui, Central Intelligence Agency

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

March 1997-April 2000: French and British Informer Helps Security Services Track Moussaoui and Shoe Bomber Reid

Reda Hassaine. Reda Hassaine. [Source: CBC] Reda Hassaine, an Algerian journalist who informs for a number of intelligence services, including an Algerian service, the French Direction Générale de la Sécurité Extérieure (DGSE), and the British Special Branch and MI5, helps intelligence agencies track Zacarias Moussaoui and shoe-bomber Richard Reid. One place Hassaine sees Moussaoui and Reid is the Four Feathers club, where leading Islamist cleric Abu Qatada preaches. [Evening Standard, 1/28/2005; O'Neill and McGrory, 2006, pp. 133] Hassaine also sees Moussaoui, Reid, and Spanish al-Qaeda leader Barakat Yarkas at the Finsbury Park mosque in London. The mosque, a hotbed of Islamic extremism headed by Abu Hamza al-Masri, is the center of attention for many intelligence agencies. Hassaine does not realize how important these people will later become at this time, but recognizes their faces when they become famous after 9/11. [O'Neill and McGrory, 2006, pp. 133] British intelligence also monitor phone calls between Moussaoui and Reid in 2000 (see Mid-2000-December 9, 2000).

Entity Tags: Direction Générale de la Sécurité Extérieure, Barakat Yarkas, Zacarias Moussaoui, UK Security Service (MI5), Special Branch (Britain), Abu Hamza al-Masri, Richard C. Reid, Reda Hassaine, Abu Qatada

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

May 15, 1998: Oklahoma FBI Memo Warns of Potential Terrorist-Related Flight Training; No Investigation Ensues

An FBI pilot sends his supervisor in the Oklahoma City FBI office a memo warning that he has observed “large numbers of Middle Eastern males receiving flight training at Oklahoma airports in recent months.” The memo, titled “Weapons of Mass Destruction,” further states this “may be related to planned terrorist activity” and “light planes would be an ideal means of spreading chemicals or biological agents.” The memo does not call for an investigation, and none occurs. [NewsOK (Oklahoma City), 5/29/2002; US Congress, 7/24/2003] The memo is “sent to the bureau’s Weapons of Mass Destruction unit and forgotten.” [New York Daily News, 9/25/2002] In 1999, it will be learned that an al-Qaeda agent has studied flight training in Norman, Oklahoma (see May 18, 1999). Hijackers Mohamed Atta and Marwan Alshehhi will briefly visit the same school in 2000; Zacarias Moussaoui will train at the school in 2001 (see February 23-June 2001).

Entity Tags: Marwan Alshehhi, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Mohamed Atta, Zacarias Moussaoui, Al-Qaeda

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

July 7, 1998: Stolen Passport Links 9/11 Hijackers and Spanish Terrorist Cells

Thieves snatch a passport from a car driven by a US tourist in Barcelona, Spain, which later finds its way into the hands of would-be hijacker Ramzi Bin al-Shibh. Bin al-Shibh allegedly uses the name on the passport in the summer of 2001 as he wires money to pay flight school tuition for Zacarias Moussaoui in Oklahoma (see July 29, 2001-August 3, 2001). After 9/11, investigators will believe the movement of this passport shows connections between the 9/11 plotters in Germany and a support network in Spain, made up mostly by ethnic Syrians. “Investigators believe that the Syrians served as deep-cover mentors, recruiters, financiers and logistics providers for the hijackers—elite backup for an elite attack team.” [Los Angeles Times, 1/14/2003] Mohamed Atta travels to Spain twice or three times in 2001 (see January 4-10, 2001, July 8-19, 2001, and September 5, 2001), perhaps to make contact with members of this Spanish support team.

Entity Tags: Mohamed Atta, Ramzi bin al-Shibh, Zacarias Moussaoui

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

After August 7, 1998: Moussaoui’s Flat Allegedly Raided After Embassy Bombings

Zacarias Moussaoui’s flat in Brixton, London, is raided after the bombing of two US embassies in East Africa (see 10:35-10:39 a.m., August 7, 1998), according to a statement made by Moussaoui in a pre-trial motion. [US District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, Alexandria Division, 7/2/2002 pdf file] There are no other reports of this and it is unclear why his flat would be raided, although there were raids in London following the embassy bombings, as bin Laden faxed a claim of responsibility to associates in the British capital (see Early 1994-September 23, 1998 and July 29-August 7, 1998). In addition, Moussaoui may be linked to a man named David Courtailler, who trained at radical camps in Afghanistan and is questioned in France in the wake of the embassy bombings. Courtailler lived in London and frequented the same mosques as Moussaoui, and intelligence agencies believe Courtailler lived with Moussaoui at one point. However, Courtailler will deny ever having met him. French authorities requested a raid of Moussaoui’s previous flat in 1994, but the raid was not carried out at that time (see 1994). [Los Angeles Times, 10/20/2001] Note: the actual text of the handwritten motion by Moussaoui is, “It is not the case that my address 23 A Lambert Road was raided after the Embassy bombing in Africa.” However, this appears to be a frequent grammatical error by Moussaoui, who is not a native speaker of English. For example, he may have been intending to ask a rhetorical question, but got the words “it” and “is” in the wrong places. Moussaoui uses the same formulation—“it is not the case that”—for events which did occur and which he seems to believe occurred, for example, “It is not the case that Mohammad Atta flew out of Miami to Madrid Spain for a week,” and, “It is not the case that Coleen Rowley, an FBI Agent in Minneapolis, sent a letter to the Congress,” so presumably he also alleges his flat was raided after the embassy bombings. [US District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, Alexandria Division, 7/2/2002 pdf file]

Entity Tags: Zacarias Moussaoui, David Courtailler

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

Fall 1998: British Informer Abu Hamza Forms Suicide Squad of Radical Islamists in London

A group of recruits at the radical Finsbury Park mosque in London, which is run by British intelligence informer and radical London imam Abu Hamza al-Masri (see Early 1997), starts to be groomed as suicide bombers. The group includes shoe bomber Richard Reid (see December 22, 2001) and Saajid Badat, one of his accomplices (see (December 14, 2001)). Some of the suicide squad live in Brixton, south London, with Zacarias Moussaoui. Salam Abdullah, a radical who attends the mosque at this time, will later say, “You could tell from the way they were treated by Abu Hamza and his aides that they were marked for something special, but we didn’t know it was for suicide attacks.” Other mosque-goers do not discuss the group, and the men do not talk about their mission, but periodically disappear, presumably to go abroad for training. Some of them are foreigners, who are known only by their nicknames, and are sent to Finsbury Park from other militant centers around Britain and Europe. Authors Sean O’Neill and Daniel McGrory will later comment: “It was in north London that the suicide bombers were provided with money, documents, and the names of the contacts who would steer them to the intended targets in the Middle East, Afghanistan, Chechnya, Kashmir, and the cities of Europe.” [O'Neill and McGrory, 2006, pp. 89-93] In addition to being an informer for the British, Abu Hamza is himself under surveillance by numerous intelligence services, including the same British ones he works for (see Summer 1996-August 1998, (November 11, 1998), and February 1999). What the British authorities know of this squad, and whether they attempt to do anything about it is unknown.

Entity Tags: Zacarias Moussaoui, Sean O’Neill, Salman Abdullah, Finsbury Park Mosque, Richard C. Reid, Daniel McGrory, Abu Hamza al-Masri, Saajid Badat

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline

1999: French Put Moussaoui on Watch List, Ask British to Monitor Him

French intelligence learns Zacarias Moussaoui went to an al-Qaeda training camp in Afghanistan in 1998 (see 1995-1998). [Independent, 12/11/2001] The Associated Press will report that he was placed on the watch list for alleged links to the GIA, an Algerian militant group. [Associated Press, 5/19/2002] The French also warn the British about Moussaoui’s training camp connections. [Los Angeles Times, 12/13/2001] French investigators ask MI5, Britain’s domestic intelligence agency, to place Moussaoui under surveillance. In early December 2001, the Independent will report that “The request appears to have been ignored” and that the British “appear to have done nothing with the information.” [Independent, 12/11/2001] However, later in the same month, the Observer will report that MI5 did in fact place Moussaoui under surveillance, as MI5 was monitoring his telephone calls in 2000 (see Mid-2000-December 9, 2000).

Entity Tags: UK Security Service (MI5), Groupe Islamique Armé, France, Zacarias Moussaoui, United Kingdom

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

Autumn 1999: Bizarre Connection Between Moussaoui and Future Beheading Victim

Nick Berg. Nick Berg. [Source: Associated Press] Nick Berg is an American who will become known for being beheaded on video in Iraq in 2004 (see March 24-May 11, 2004). It will later come out that he had a curious connection to Zacarias Moussaoui. In the autumn of 1999, Berg is a university student in Norman, Oklahoma, where Moussaoui will attend flight school in early 2001. According to Berg’s father, one day Nick Berg is riding a bus to his classes and he meets Moussaoui on the bus. Moussaoui asks him for his password so he can use Berg’s laptop to check the Internet. Berg gives him his password. FBI investigators later will discover Moussaoui’s use of this password, and will interview Berg about it in 2002. Berg will be cleared of any criminal connection with Moussaoui. Jayna Davis, a former NBC reporter known for her controversial investigation of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, calls the explanation as to why Moussaoui had Berg’s password “totally nonsensical.” She will note the low odds of anyone being able to log onto the Internet on a bus in 1999 and will say, “You’re sitting on a bus. It’s a five- to ten-minute ride. How in the world would a stranger sitting next to you say, ‘Hey, can I borrow your laptop computer because I want to log on to your e-mail?’” She also notes that the FBI insists Berg gave his password to an acquaintance of Moussaoui, while Berg’s family insists it was Moussaoui himself on the bus. [NewsMax, 5/18/2004; CBS News, 5/21/2004] The London Times will note that this acquaintance “is believed to have been Hussein al-Attas,” Moussaoui’s roommate when he will be arrested in Minnesota in August 2001. The Times will note that Berg’s “past links to an al-Qaeda terrorist have raised questions in some quarters as to whether he might even have been working for the intelligence services.” [London Times, 5/23/2004]

Entity Tags: Jayna Davis, Hussein al-Attas, Nick Berg, Zacarias Moussaoui

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

September 1999: FBI Investigates Flight School Attendee Connected to Bin Laden

Agents from Oklahoma City FBI office visit the Airman Flight School in Norman, Oklahoma to investigate Ihab Ali Nawawi, who has been identified as bin Laden’s former personal pilot in a recent trial. The agents learned that Nawawi received his commercial pilot’s license at the school 1993, then traveled to another school in Oklahoma City to qualify for a rating to fly small business aircraft. He is later named as an unindicted coconspirator in the 1998 US Embassy bombing in Kenya. The trial witness who gave this information, Essam al Ridi, also attended flight school in the US, then bought a plane and flew it to Afghanistan for bin Laden to use (see Early 1993). [Boston Globe, 9/18/2001; CNN, 10/16/2001; Washington Post, 5/19/2002; US Congress, 10/17/2002] When Nawawi was arrested in May 1999, he was working as a taxi driver in Orlando, Florida (see May 18, 1999). Investigators discover recent ties between him and high-ranking al-Qaeda leaders, and suspect he was a “sleeper” agent. [St. Petersburg Times, 10/28/2001] However, the FBI agent visiting the school is not given most background details about him. [US Congress, 7/24/2003] It is not known if these investigators are aware of a terrorist flight school warning given by the Oklahoma City FBI office in 1998. Hijackers Mohamed Atta and Marwan Alshehhi later visit the Airman school in July 2000 but ultimately will decide to train in Florida instead. [Boston Globe, 9/18/2001] Al-Qaeda agent Zacarias Moussaoui will take flight lessons at Airman in February 2001 (see February 23-June 2001). One of the FBI agents sent to visit the school at this time visits it again in August 2001 asking about Moussaoui, but he will fail to make a connection between the two visits (see August 23, 2001).

Entity Tags: Mohamed Atta, Marwan Alshehhi, Essam al Ridi, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Zacarias Moussaoui, Ihab Ali Nawawi

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline

Late 1999-Late 2000: French Continue to Develop ‘Thick File’ on Moussaoui as He Works with Radical Militants

Masooud Al-Benin. Masooud Al-Benin. [Source: Public domain] After the French put Zacarias Moussaoui on a watch list some time in 1999 (see 1999), they continue to discover more of his ties to militant groups. In late 1999, Moussaoui’s mother says a French intelligence officer contacts her and says her son’s name was in the address book of a man named Yannick who had died fighting for the Muslim cause in Bosnia. [Los Angeles Times, 12/13/2001] In April 2000, French investigators increase their interest in Moussaoui when they learn his best friend Masooud Al-Benin was killed while fighting in Chechnya. Investigators conclude al-Benin and Moussaoui traveled and fought together in Chechnya. Moussaoui’s mother is contacted by French authorities and asked about her son’s whereabouts and his connections to Al-Benin. [CNN, 12/11/2001] At some time in 2000, French intelligence follows Moussaoui to Pakistan. They believe he goes to see an al-Qaeda leader named Abu Jaffa. [CBS News, 5/8/2002] (Abu Jaffa, also known by the names Abu Jafar al-Jaziri and Omar Chaabani, is an Algerian in charge of al-Qaeda’s training camps in Afghanistan. It appears he will be killed in Afghanistan in late 2001.) [Knight Ridder, 1/9/2002] By 2001, French intelligence will be said to have a “thick file on Moussaoui.” [CBS News, 5/8/2002] When Moussaoui is arrested in the US, the French will send this information to Washington at the FBI’s request (see August 22, 2001 and August 30, 2001).

Entity Tags: Masooud Al-Benin, Zacarias Moussaoui, Abu Jaffa, France

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

December 21, 1999: FBI Misses Chance to Discover Moussaoui’s Al-Qaeda Connections

The FBI misses a chance to learn about Zacarias Moussaoui after a raid in Dublin, Ireland. On December 14, 1999, Ahmed Ressam was arrested trying to smuggle explosives into the US (see December 14, 1999). On December 21, Irish police arrest Hamid Aich and several other North African immigrants living in Dublin. [New York Times, 1/22/2000] During the arrests, police seize a large amount of documents relating to citizenship applications, identities, credit cards, and airplane tickets. A diagram of an electrical switch that could be used for a bomb is found that is identical to a diagram found in Ressam’s apartment in Vancouver, Canada. [Irish Times, 7/31/2002] The suspects are released about a day later, but, “Within days, authorities in Ireland and the United States began to realize that they might have missed a chance to learn more about a terrorist network.” [New York Times, 1/22/2000] It is discovered that Aich lived with Ressam in Montreal, and then later lived with him in Vancouver. Investigators conclude there has been an al-Qaeda cell in Dublin since the early 1990s, when the charity Mercy International opened an office there (this charity has several known al-Qaeda connections by this time (see 1988-Spring 1995 and Late 1996-August 20, 1998) and also an alleged CIA connection (see 1989 and After)). The cell is mainly involved in providing travel and identity documents for other cells committing violent acts. Investigators also connect Aich to the Islamic Jihad. But the US and Canada do not seek Aich’s extradition, and instead have the Irish police keep him under surveillance. He will escape from Ireland shortly before 9/11 (see June 3, 2001-July 24, 2001). [New York Times, 1/22/2000; Irish Times, 7/31/2002] Apparently, many of the documents seized in the raid will only be closely examined after 9/11. Documents will show that in 1999 and 2000, Mustafa Ahmed al-Hawsawi, a top al-Qaeda financier, worked with the Dublin cell to finance Moussaoui’s international travel. Aich made travel arrangements and possibly provided fake identification for Moussaoui. [Fox News, 7/30/2002; Irish Times, 7/31/2002] Presumably, had these links been discovered after the 1999 raid instead of after 9/11, events could have gone very differently when Moussaoui was arrested in the US in August 2001 (see August 16, 2001).

Entity Tags: Zacarias Moussaoui, Al-Qaeda, Mercy International, Islamic Jihad, Hamid Aich, Ahmed Ressam, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Mustafa Ahmed al-Hawsawi

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

Between February and September 2000: Malaysian Intelligence Stops Monitoring Al-Qaeda Summit Location, at CIA’s Request

The condominium complex where the Malaysia summit was held. [Source: Fox News] (click image to enlarge) After the al-Qaeda summit in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in January 2000 (see January 5-8, 2000), the CIA has Malaysian intelligence stop monitoring the condominium where the summit was held. The condominium is owned by al-Qaeda operative Yazid Sufaat, who plays a key role in al-Qaeda search for biological weapons (see December 19, 2001). According to a later Newsweek account, after the summit, “Malaysian intelligence continued to watch the condo at the CIA’s request, but after a while the agency lost interest.” It is unclear when the surveillance stops exactly, but it stops some time before al-Qaeda operative Zacarias Moussaoui visits Malaysia in September 2000. Moussaoui stays in Sufaat’s condominium, but the CIA misses a chance to learn about this (see September-October 2000). The Malaysians will later say they were surprised by the CIA’s lack of interest. “We couldn’t fathom it, really,” Rais Yatim, Malaysia’s Legal Affairs minister, will tell Newsweek. “There was no show of concern.” [Newsweek, 6/2/2002]

Entity Tags: Zacarias Moussaoui, Malaysian Secret Service, Central Intelligence Agency, Al-Qaeda, Rais Yatim, Yazid Sufaat

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

May 17, 2000-May 2001: Bin Al-Shibh US Visas Rejected, Possibly Because of Ties to USS Cole Bombing

Ramzi bin al-Shibh. Ramzi bin al-Shibh. [Source: FBI] During these months, Hamburg al-Qaeda cell member Ramzi bin al-Shibh tries several times to get a US visa, but all his attempts fail, some possibly due to a link to the USS Cole bombing. In 2000, he tries to a get a visa three times from Germany, and once from Yemen, but all these attempts fail. He may also make a fifth attempt in May 2001, although the 9/11 Commission will not include that in their final report. One of the applications says he will be visiting Agus Budiman, a Hamburg associate, in Washington (see October-November 2000). [Los Angeles Times, 10/24/2001; Australian, 12/24/2002; 9/11 Commission, 8/21/2004, pp. 11-15 pdf file; McDermott, 2005, pp. 209] Most accounts claim that bin al-Shibh is refused a visa on economic grounds based on fears that he will overstay his visa and work in the US. One official later suggests it was “only by luck” that he was turned down. [CBS News, 6/6/2002; Washington Post, 7/14/2002] However, Bin al-Shibh is in Yemen during the two months before the bombing of the Cole in that country, and investigators later conclude that he may have been involved in that attack (see Cole Bombing')" onmouseout="return nd()">October 10-21, 2000 and October 12, 2000). Possibly for this reason other accounts note that, as the London Times will put it, he was “turned down on security grounds.” [London Times, 9/9/2002] Newsweek will later report, “One senior law-enforcement official told Newsweek that bin al-Shibh’s efforts to obtain a US visa were rebuffed because of suspicions that he was tied to the bombing of the USS Cole .” [Los Angeles Times, 10/21/2001; Newsweek, 11/26/2001; BBC, 9/14/2002] In addition, Al Jazeera journalist Yosri Fouda will say that according to his US intelligence sources, bin al-Shibh’s visas were “turned down because he was implicated in the USS Cole attack.” [TBS Journal, 10/2002] But no journalist will ever question why this information didn’t lead to the unraveling of the 9/11 plot. Not only is there the obvious visa connection to Ziad Jarrah while he is training at a US flight school, but also during this same time period bin al-Shibh wires money to Marwan Alshehhi, Zacarias Moussaoui, and others, sometimes using his own name. [CBS News, 6/6/2002] It is unclear how the US would know about his ties to the bombing at this time, though it’s possible that the consular official who reviews his fourth attempt in Berlin in October/November 2000 sees that al-Shibh entered Yemen one day before the attack and leaves shortly after it (see Cole Bombing')" onmouseout="return nd()">October 10-21, 2000). [9/11 Commission, 8/21/2004, pp. 15 pdf file]

Entity Tags: Federal Bureau of Investigation, Agus Budiman, Ziad Jarrah, Ramzi bin al-Shibh, Zacarias Moussaoui, Marwan Alshehhi, Yosri Fouda

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

Summer 2000-September 11, 2001: Illegal FBI Activity Leads to Suspension of Surveillance of Al-Qaeda Suspects in US

FISA court judge Royce Lamberth was angry with the FBI over misleading statements made in FISA wiretap applications. FISA court judge Royce Lamberth was angry with the FBI over misleading statements made in FISA wiretap applications. [Source: Public domain] While monitoring foreign terrorists in the US, the FBI listens to calls made by suspects as a part of an operation called Catcher’s Mitt, which is curtailed at this time due to misleading statements by FBI agents. It is never revealed who the targets of the FBI’s surveillance are under this operation, but below are some of the terrorism suspects under investigation in the US at the time:
bullet Imran Mandhai, Shuyeb Mossa Jokhan and Adnan El Shukrijumah in Florida. They are plotting a series of attacks there, but Mandhai and Jokhan are brought in for questioning by the FBI and surveillance of them stops in late spring (see November 2000-Spring 2002 and May 2, 2001);
bullet Another Florida cell connected to Blind Sheikh Omar Abdul-Rahman. The FBI has been investigating it since 1993 (see (October 1993-November 2001));
bullet Al-Qaeda operatives in Denver (see March 2000);
bullet A Boston-based al-Qaeda cell involving Nabil al-Marabh and Raed Hijazi. Cell members provide funding to terrorists, fight abroad, and are involved in document forging (see January 2001, Spring 2001, and Early September 2001);
bullet Fourteen of the hijackers’ associates the FBI investigates before 9/11. The FBI is still investigating four of these people while the hijackers associate with them; [US Congress, 7/24/2003, pp. 169 pdf file]
bullet Hamas operatives such as Mohammed Salah in Chicago. Salah invests money in the US and sends it to the occupied territories to fund attacks (see June 9, 1998). When problems are found with the applications for the wiretap warrants, an investigation is launched (see Summer-October 2000), and new requirements for warrant applications are put in place (see October 2000). From this time well into 2001, the FBI is forced to shut down wiretaps of al-Qaeda-related suspects connected to the 1998 US embassy bombings and Hamas (see March 2001 and April 2001). One source familiar with the case says that about 10 to 20 al-Qaeda related wiretaps have to be shut down and it becomes more difficult to get permission for new FISA wiretaps. Newsweek notes, “The effect [is] to stymie terror surveillance at exactly the moment it was needed most: requests from both Phoenix [with the Ken Williams memo (see July 10, 2001)] and Minneapolis [with Zacarias Moussaoui’s arrest] for wiretaps [will be] turned down [by FBI superiors],” (see August 21, 2001 and August 28, 2001). [Newsweek, 5/27/2002] Robert Wright is an FBI agent who led the Vulgar Betrayal investigation looking into allegations that Saudi businessman Yassin al-Qadi helped finance the embassy bombings, and other matters. In late 2002, he will claim to discover evidence that some of the FBI intelligence agents who stalled and obstructed his investigation were the same FBI agents who misrepresented the FISA petitions. [Judicial Watch, 9/11/2002]

Entity Tags: Royce Lamberth, Shuyeb Mossa Jokhan, Catcher’s Mitt, Robert G. Wright, Jr., Zacarias Moussaoui, Raed Hijazi, Mohammad Salah, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Al-Qaeda, Adnan Shukrijumah, Central Intelligence Agency, Nabil al-Marabh, Ken Williams, Imran Mandhai, Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

Mid-2000-December 9, 2000: British Intelligence Monitors Moussaoui; Records Him Talking to Future Shoe Bomber Richard Reid

Richard Reid. Richard Reid. [Source: Plymouth County Jail] MI5, Britain’s domestic intelligence agency, has Zacarias Moussaoui under surveillance. The French government had asked MI5 to monitor him in 1999 (see 1999), but it has not been confirmed if this is in response to that request. It is not clear when the surveillance begins, but the Observer reports that it lasts for “months” and ends when Moussaoui leaves Britain on December 9, 2000, to attend an al-Qaeda training camp in Afghanistan. The extent of Moussaoui’s surveillance is not publicly known; the only reported detail is that some phone calls between Moussaoui and Richard Reid are intercepted. Reid will later be convicted for attempting to blow up a passenger airliner with a bomb in his shoe (see December 22, 2001). MI5 records the conversations between them made inside Britain. Opposition politicians in Britain will later criticize MI5 for not realizing Reid’s al-Qaeda ties between 9/11 and Reid’s shoe bomb plot over two months later. [Observer, 12/30/2001; Wall Street Journal, 12/31/2001] Moussaoui appears to be in contact with other al-Qaeda figures during this time. For instance, he travels to Yazid Sufaat’s house in Malaysia in September 2000 and again in October 2000 (see September-October 2000), and Ramzi bin al-Shibh stays in London for a week in early December 2000 and meets with Moussaoui (see October 2000-February 2001). [Independent, 12/11/2001] However, it is not known if such contacts are monitored as well.

Entity Tags: Yazid Sufaat, United Kingdom, Zacarias Moussaoui, Ramzi bin al-Shibh, Richard C. Reid, UK Security Service (MI5)

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

September-October 2000: Moussaoui Visits Malaysia After CIA Stops Surveillance There

Yazid Sufaat (left), and his wife, Sejarahtul Dursina (right). Yazid Sufaat (left), and his wife, Sejarahtul Dursina (right). [Source: Associated Press] Zacarias Moussaoui visits Malaysia twice, and stays at the very same condominium where the January 2000 al-Qaeda summit (see January 5-8, 2000) was held. [Los Angeles Times, 2/2/2002; Washington Post, 2/3/2002; CNN, 8/30/2002] After that summit, Malaysian intelligence kept watch on the condominium at the request of the CIA. However, the CIA stopped the surveillance before Moussaoui arrived, spoiling a chance to expose the 9/11 plot by monitoring Moussaoui’s later travels (see Between February and September 2000). [Newsweek, 6/2/2002] During his stay in Malaysia, Moussaoui tells Jemaah Islamiyah operative Faiz abu Baker Bafana, at whose apartment he stays for one night, that he had had a dream about flying an airplane into the White House, and that when he told bin Laden about this, bin Laden told him to go ahead. They also discuss purchasing ammonium nitrate, and Moussaoui says that Malaysia and Indonesia should be used as a base for financing jihad, but that attacks should be focused against the US. [US District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, Alexandria Division, 3/8/2006; US District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, Alexandria Division, 3/8/2006] While Moussaoui is in Malaysia, Yazid Sufaat, the owner of the condominium, signs letters falsely identifying Moussaoui as a representative of his wife’s company. [Washington Post, 2/3/2002; Reuters, 9/20/2002] When Moussaoui is later arrested in the US about one month before the 9/11 attacks, this letter in his possession could have led investigators back to the condominium and the connections with the January 2000 meeting attended by two of the hijackers. [USA Today, 1/30/2002] Moussaoui’s belongings also contained phone numbers that could have linked him to Ramzi bin al-Shibh (and his roommate, Mohamed Atta), another participant in the Malaysian meeting (see August 16, 2001). [Associated Press, 12/12/2001]

Entity Tags: Osama bin Laden, Yazid Sufaat, Mohamed Atta, Zacarias Moussaoui, Ramzi bin al-Shibh, Malaysian Secret Service, Rais Yatim, Central Intelligence Agency, Faiz abu Baker Bafana

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

Early September 2000: Moussaoui Checks Out Malaysian Flight School

While in Malaysia (see September-October 2000), Zacarias Moussaoui visits the Royal Selangor Flying Club at a Malaysian Air Force base near Kuala Lumpur to inquire about learning to fly there, but decides xbuhhrlp. negozio di goose outlet canadanot to pursue lessons after learning the cost. Moussaoui is driven to the club by Jemaah Islamiyah operative Faiz abu Baker Bafana, who had previously taken another al-Qaeda trainee pilot, Zaini Zakaria, to the same flying club (see (Spring 2000)). Moussaoui will eventually begin his training in the US (see February 23-June 2001). [US District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, Alexandria Division, 3/8/2006]

Entity Tags: Faiz abu Baker Bafana, Zacarias Moussaoui, Royal Selangor Flying Club

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

October 2000-February 2001: Moussaoui Travels to London and Afghanistan

Zacarias Moussaoui had been staying in Malaysia so that he could take flight training classes at the Malaysian Flying Academy in Malacca. However, he is unhappy with the quality of training there. He takes the $35,000 given to him by his hosts, Yazid Sufaat and Hambali, and spends it to buy fertilizer to construct bombs. Then he gives up and travels to London in early December (see Mid-2000-December 9, 2000), where he meets with Ramzi bin al-Shibh (who stays in London from December 2 to 9). Hambali sends a messenger to Khalid Shaikh Mohammed in Afghanistan to complain about Moussaoui’s attitude. On December 9, Moussaoui leaves London. He makes his way to Afghanistan and meets with Mohammed. Mohammed decides to send him to take flight training classes in the US instead. He is given $35,000 in cash to pay for flying lessons by someone in Pakistan. After he enters the US in February, bin al-Shibh wires him another $14,000 from Germany. [Knight Ridder, 9/9/2002; Washington Post, 3/28/2003; US Congress, 7/24/2003 pdf file]

Entity Tags: Hambali, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, Ramzi bin al-Shibh, Yazid Sufaat, Zacarias Moussaoui

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

November 5, 2000-June 20, 2001: Atta, Alhazmi, and Moussaoui Purchase Equipment from Same Pilot Store

Zacarias Moussaoui and two of the 9/11 hijackers purchase flight training equipment from Sporty’s Pilot Shop in Batavia, Ohio.
bullet November 5, 2000: Mohamed Atta purchases flight deck videos for a Boeing 747-200 and a Boeing 757-200, as well as other items;
bullet December 11, 2000: Atta purchases flight deck videos for a Boeing 767-300ER and an Airbus A320-200;
bullet March 19, 2001: Nawaf Alhazmi purchases flight deck videos for a Boeing 747-400, a Boeing 747-200, and a Boeing 777-200, as well as another video. Alhazmi also purchases maps around this time from another shop (see March 23, 2001);
bullet June 20, 2001: Zacarias Moussaoui purchases flight deck videos for a Boeing 747-400 and a Boeing 747-200. [Sporty's, 6/20/2001; US District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, Alexandria Division, 12/11/2001 pdf file] However, it is not clear whether Moussaoui was to take part in 9/11 or some other operation (see January 30, 2003).

Entity Tags: Zacarias Moussaoui, Mohamed Atta, Nawaf Alhazmi, Sporty’s Pilot Shop

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

Early 2001-August 2001: Some 9/11 Hijackers Seen Flying Planes in Oklahoma in Same Airport as Moussaoui

Future 9/11 hijackers Mohamed Atta, Marwan Alshehhi, and Waleed Alshehri are seen flying small aircraft at an airport in Oklahoma, and Zacarias Moussaoui is there at the same time. This is according to a 2002 FBI document about the 9/11 attacks. The document notes that “several employees” at Million Air, located at Wiley Post Airport in Bethany, Oklahoma, see Atta, Alshehhi, and Alshehri on the same Beechcraft Duchess aircraft at the same time. Furthermore, Moussaoui is seen there in the same timeframe, although the FBI report will not mention if Moussaoui is ever seen with the other three. The employees cannot give exact dates when these people are seen, but all the visits are in the six months leading up to 9/11 and two visits are said to take place after August 4, 2001. [Federal Bureau of Investigation, 4/19/2002]
Other Local Connections - Moussaoui takes flying lessons in Norman, Oklahoma, which is about 30 miles away from Bethany, from February to June 2001. Apparently he stays there most of the time until early August (see February 23-June 2001). Atta and Alshehhi visited the flight school in Norman in July 2000 (see July 2-3, 2000). A motel owner will later claim that around August 1, 2001, he saw Moussaoui, Atta, and Alshehhi together at his motel. The location of the motel is not specified, except that it is about 28 miles from Norman and off Highway 40, which runs about five miles south of Bethany (see August 1, 2001). [LA Weekly, 8/2/2002]
Why No Mention in Moussaoui Trial? - Several years after 9/11, US officials will charge Moussaoui with a role in the 9/11 attacks. Strangely, these sightings in Oklahoma will never be mentioned in the trial, even though almost no evidence is put forward in the trial physically linking Moussaoui to any of the 9/11 hijackers in the US (see May 3, 2006).

Entity Tags: Marwan Alshehhi, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Mohamed Atta, Waleed Alshehri, Zacarias Moussaoui

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

Early February 2001: Moussaoui Given US Visa despite Presence on French Watch List

The US Embassy in London grants a US student visa to Zacarias Moussaoui, a French citizen. The Los Angeles Times will later note this is granted “even though he was on a special French immigration watch list of suspected Islamic extremists.” [Los Angeles Times, 10/14/2001]

Entity Tags: Zacarias Moussaoui

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

Between February 23, 2001 and June 2001: Germans Monitor Call Between Moussaoui and Bin Al-Shibh

While Zacarias Moussaoui is living in Norman, Oklahoma, and getting flight training there, he makes a phone call to Germany that is monitored by German intelligence. The call is to Ramzi bin al-Shibh, who is intimately involved in the 9/11 plot and has been a roommate of hijackers Mohamed Atta and Marwan Alshehhi. [New York Times, 9/29/2001] Bin al-Shibh stayed in London for a week in early December 2000 and met with Moussaoui there (see October 2000-February 2001). Phone records further indicate that there was at least one phone call between Moussaoui and the landlord of the Hamburg apartment where Mohamed Atta and other 9/11 hijackers lived. But the timing of the call has not been revealed, nor is it known if that call was monitored as well or not. [Independent, 12/11/2001]

Entity Tags: Ramzi bin al-Shibh, Zacarias Moussaoui

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

February 23-August 16, 2001: Moussaoui and 9/11 Hijackers Engage in Parallel Conduct

After entering the US, Zacarias Moussaoui engages in activities that appear to mirror those of the 9/11 hijackers. Both Moussaoui and the hijackers do the following:
bullet Take flight training (see February 23-June 2001 and July 6-December 19, 2000);
bullet Physically import large amounts of cash (see October 2000-February 2001 and January 15, 2000-August 2001);
bullet Purchase knives with short blades that can be carried onto airliners (see August 16, 2001 and July 8-August 30, 2001);
bullet Take fitness training (see August 16, 2001 and May 6-September 6, 2001);
bullet Obtain several identification documents (see April 12-September 7, 2001 and August 1-2, 2001); and
bullet Purchase flight deck videos from the same shop (see November 5, 2000-June 20, 2001). In addition, Moussaoui is supported by some of the same al-Qaeda operatives as the 9/11 hijackers: Ramzi bin al-Shibh (see July 29, 2001-August 3, 2001 and June 13-September 25, 2000) and Yazid Sufaat (see September-October 2000 and January 5-8, 2000). At Moussaoui’s trial, the prosecution will cite these parallel activities in its argument that Moussaoui was connected to 9/11, rather than some follow-up plot. There is also one reported meeting between Moussaoui and two of the lead hijackers before 9/11 (see August 1, 2001), but this will not be mentioned at the trial (see March 6-May 4, 2006). [US District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, Alexandria Division, 3/9/2006]

Entity Tags: Zacarias Moussaoui

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

February 23-June 2001: Moussaoui Takes Lessons at Flight School Previously Used by Al-Qaeda

Airman Flight School. Airman Flight School. [Source: FBI] Al-Qaeda operative Zacarias Moussaoui flies to the US. Three days later, he starts flight training at the Airman Flight School in Norman, Oklahoma. (Other Islamic extremists had previously trained at the same flight school or other schools in the area (see September 1999)). He trains there until May, but does not do well and drops out before getting a pilot’s license. His visa expires on May 22, but he does not attempt to renew it or get another one. He stays in Norman, arranging to change flight schools, and frequently exercising in a gym. [MSNBC, 12/11/2001; US Congress, 10/17/2002] According to US investigators, would-be hijacker Ramzi Bin al-Shibh later says he meets Moussaoui in Karachi, Pakistan, in June 2001 (see June 2001). [Washington Post, 11/20/2002]

Entity Tags: Airman Flight School, Zacarias Moussaoui, Ramzi bin al-Shibh

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

(Between February 24-August 16, 2001): Moussaoui Writes Blackwater Phone Number in Notebook

A page of Zacarias Moussaoui’s notebook with a phone number for the security contractor Blackwater. A page of Zacarias Moussaoui’s notebook with a phone number for the security contractor Blackwater. [Source: US District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, Alexandria Division] Zacarias Moussaoui writes the phone number for the private security contractor Blackwater in his notebook. [US District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, Alexandria District, 7/31/2006 pdf file] It is unclear why he writes the phone number down or whether he has any actual contact with Blackwater, but terrorism analyst J. M. Berger will later comment: “The discovery may best be taken with the proverbial grain of salt, and a large one at that. The phone number is publicly available and connects to a Blackwater training center in North Carolina. Moussaoui was researching physical and combat training options while he was in the United States. The simplest and most innocent explanation is quite possibly the correct one. Nevertheless, a glimpse of the controversial company’s contact information nestled among Moussaoui’s handwritten notes inspires the jaw to drop in a not-entirely unreasonable manner.” [Intelwire(.com), 8/1/2006]

Entity Tags: Blackwater USA, Zacarias Moussaoui, John M. Berger

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

April 2001: Informer Shares Some Information on Moussaoui with CIA

A CIA informer who is aware of Zacarias Moussaoui’s connection to terrorism and met him in Azerbaijan in 1997 (see 1997) shares some information on him with the CIA. However, the informer is not aware of Moussaoui’s real name and knows him under an alias, “Abu Khalid al-Francia.” An intelligence official will indicate in 2002 that the source reports on Moussaoui under this name. However, CIA director George Tenet, writing in 2007, will say that the informer only reports on Moussaoui as “al Francia.” One of Moussaoui’s known aliases in 2001 is Abu Khalid al-Sahrawi, similar to the name the source knows him under, but when Moussaoui is arrested in the US (see August 16, 2001) the CIA apparently does not realize that Abu Khalid al-Francia is Moussaoui. [MSNBC, 12/11/2001; Associated Press, 6/4/2002; Tenet, 2007, pp. 201]

Entity Tags: Central Intelligence Agency, Zacarias Moussaoui

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline, 9/11 Timeline

Summer 2001: Candidate 9/11 Hijacker Possibly Arrested in US, Then Released

Abderraouf Jdey. Abderraouf Jdey. [Source: FBI] A candidate 9/11 hijacker named Abderraouf Jdey is possibly arrested and then released in the US around this time, although details remain very murky.
CIA Officer's Curious Report - In 2010, Rolf Mowatt-Larssen will write a public report for the Harvard Kennedy School entitled, “Al Qaeda Weapons of Mass Destruction Threat: Hype or Reality?” Mowatt-Larssen was a CIA official from 1982 to 2005, and was head of the CIA’s Counterterrorism Center (CTC) for a time. Around the time of 9/11, he was the head of the CTC’s weapons of mass destruction branch (see 1982, Early October-December 2001, and November 2005). In a timeline in Mowatt-Larssen’s report, there is this entry for Summer 2001: “Detention of Abderraouf Yousef Jdey, a biology major with possible interest in biological and nuclear weapons, who traveled with Zacharias Moussaoui from Canada into the United States. Moussaoui is detained with crop duster manuals in his possession; Jdey had biology textbooks. Earlier, they attended McMaster University in Canada, along with Adnan Shukrijumah.” This entry is very curious, because although the report is said to be based entirely on publicly sourced material, there has been no public information about Jdey’s arrest or link with Moussaoui, and the footnotes to the entry do not mention these things either. [Mowatt-Larson, 1/2010 pdf file]
Jdey's 9/11 Connection - In late 1999, Jdey may have attended an advanced training course in Afghanistan also attended by 9/11 hijackers Khalid Almihdhar and Nawaf Alhazmi (see Cole Bomber and Other Militants')" onmouseout="return nd()">Late 1999). He may also have been instructed by 9/11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed at the same time as hijacker Mohamed Atta and Ramzi bin-al-Shibh. A letter recovered from a safe house in Afghanistan in late 2001, apparently written by al-Qaeda leader Saif al-Adel, says that Jdey was originally meant to be one of the 9/11 hijackers. A videotape of Jdey pledging to be a martyr was also discovered in mid-November 2001 in Afghanistan, in the wreckage of al-Qaeda leader Mohammed Atef’s house (see November 15-Late December 2001). [9/11 Commission, 7/24/2004, pp. 527]
Jdey Is Highly Wanted After 9/11 - Jdey was born in Tunisia, but became a Canadian citizen in the mid-1990s. After 9/11, it is known that he leaves Canada in November 2001. In January 2002, the US government will announce they are seeking him. In 2005, the FBI will announce a $5 million reward for him. [Los Angeles Times, 1/26/2002; CBC News, 5/27/2004; Rewards for Justice, 4/2005]

canada géna usa

goose jackets
canada goose sverige
chilliwack bomber canada goose
foto d'oca
Canada Goose Jacks

Empire britannique

Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Aller à : navigation, rechercher Si ce bandeau n'est plus pertinent, retirez-le. Cliquez pour voir d'autres modèles. Cet article ne respecte pas la neutralité de point de vue  (indiquez la date de pose grâce au paramètre date ) .

Considérez son contenu avec précaution et/ou discutez-en. Il est possible de préciser les sections non neutres en utilisant {{section non neutre}} et de souligner les passages problématiques avec {{passage non neutre}}.

Empire britannique
British Empire ( en )

XVI e  siècle- XX e  siècle

Drapeau
Union Flag

Hymne : God Save the Queen

Description de cette image, également commentée ci-après Les zones du monde qui firent à une époque partie de l'Empire britannique. Les actuels territoires britanniques d'outre-mer sont soulignés en rouge. Informations générales Statut Monarchie parlementaire Capitale Londres Langue Anglais et langues locales Religion Anglicanisme, protestantisme et religions locales Monnaie Livre sterling Démographie Population 1939 [ 1 ] , [ 2 ] 450 000 000 hab. Superficie Superficie 1939 [ 1 ] , [ 2 ] 33 000 000   km 2 (ensemble) 26 000 000   km 2 Histoire et événements 1600 Monopole de la Compagnie des Indes dans l'océan Indien. 1607 Jamestown est la première colonie américaine. 1707 L'Acte d'Union est signé. 1770 James Cook arrive en Australie. 1791 L'Acte constitutionnel instaure le Haut et le Bas-Canada. 1815 Les Britanniques s'imposent contre Napoléon. 1837 La reine Victoria commence son règne. 1882 Le Canal de Suez passe sous contrôle britannique. 1914 L'Empire se bat au côté de la Triple-Entente. 1921 L'État libre d'Irlande est formé. 1997 Le Royaume-Uni cède Hong Kong à la République Populaire de Chine

Entités précédentes :

Entités suivantes :

L’Empire britannique ou Empire colonial britannique était un ensemble territorial composé des dominions, colonies, protectorats, mandats et autres territoires gouvernés ou administrés par le Royaume-Uni [ 3 ] . Il trouve son origine dans les comptoirs commerciaux puis les colonies outre-mer établis très progressivement par l'Angleterre, à partir de la fin du XVI e  siècle. Elle était la première puissance mondiale [ 4 ] à son apogée en 1922, avec un quart de la population mondiale, soit environ 400 millions d'habitants [ 5 ] et s'étendait sur 29,8 millions de km² (environ 22 % des terres émergées) [ 6 ] , [ 7 ] . En conséquence, son héritage dans les domaines de la politique, du droit, de la linguistique et de la culture est colossal.

Au cours de l'Âge des découvertes aux XV e et XVI e siècles, le Portugal et l'Espagne fondèrent de vastes empires. Envieux des richesses conférées par ces empires, l'Angleterre, la France et les Pays-Bas commencèrent à établir des colonies et des comptoirs commerciaux en Amérique et en Asie [ 8 ] . Une série de guerres avec la France plaça l'Amérique du Nord sous le contrôle de l'Angleterre, juste avant la perte des Treize colonies en 1783 après la guerre d'indépendance des États-Unis. L'attention britannique se tourna alors vers l'Afrique, l'Asie et le Pacifique. À la suite de la défaite de la France napoléonienne en 1815, la Grande-Bretagne connut un siècle de domination sans partage et étendit ses possessions dans le monde entier. Elle accorda des degrés divers d'autonomie aux colonies blanches dont certaines devinrent des dominions.

La montée en puissance de l'Allemagne et des États-Unis éroda la domination économique britannique vers la fin du XIX e  siècle. Les tensions économiques et militaires entre la Grande-Bretagne et l'Allemagne furent l'une des causes majeures de la Première Guerre mondiale, au cours de laquelle le Royaume-Uni fit largement appel à son empire. Le conflit ruina le pays, dont l'économie fut distancée par ses voisins dans l'après-guerre, et si l'empire atteignit son expansion maximale, il n'avait plus la même puissance incontestée. Lors de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, les colonies britanniques d'Asie du Sud-Est furent occupées par le Japon, ce qui porta atteinte au prestige britannique et accéléra le déclin de l'empire malgré la défaite finale du Japon. Les Indes, possession la plus importante et la plus peuplée, obtinrent leur indépendance deux ans après la guerre.

Après la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, dans le cadre des mouvements de décolonisation expérimentés par les puissances européennes, la plupart des territoires de l'Empire britannique obtinrent leur indépendance. À la même époque, en 1956, la crise de Suez, qui tourna au fiasco pour la Grande-Bretagne, symbolise sa perte de puissance face aux États-Unis notamment. L'acte final du mouvement de décolonisation fut la rétrocession de Hong Kong à la Chine en 1997. 14 territoires restent toutefois sous souveraineté britannique au sein des territoires britanniques d'outre-mer. Après leur indépendance, la plupart des anciennes colonies rejoignirent le Commonwealth of Nations , une association libre d'États indépendants. 16 nations du Commonwealth conservent le monarque britannique comme chef d'État en tant que royaumes du Commonwealth.

Sommaire

Origines (1497–1583) [ modifier | modifier le code ]

Réplique de la The Matthew utilisée par Jean Cabot lors de son second voyage vers le Nouveau Monde

La fondation de l'Empire britannique eut lieu alors que l'Angleterre et l'Écosse étaient des royaumes séparés. En 1496, à la suite des succès espagnols et portugais outre-mer, le roi Henri VII d'Angleterre chargea Jean Cabot de mener un voyage dans l'Atlantique nord pour découvrir une route vers l'Asie [ 9 ] . Cabot quitta l'Angleterre en 1497, cinq ans après la découverte de l'Amérique, et arriva sur les côtes de Terre-Neuve (croyant à tort, comme Christophe Colomb qu'il avait atteint l'Asie) [ 10 ] mais il n'y eut pas de tentative pour établir une colonie. Cabot lança une nouvelle expédition l'année suivante mais disparut en mer [ 11 ] .

Les Anglais ne firent aucune tentative d'implantation en Amérique avant le règne d'Élisabeth I re , à la fin du XVI e  siècle [ 12 ] . L'Angleterre protestante était maintenant ennemie de l'Espagne catholique [ 9 ] . En 1562, la Couronne britannique autorisa les corsaires John Hawkins et Francis Drake à mener des attaques contre les navires négriers espagnols et portugais le long de la côte de l'Afrique du Nord [ 13 ] . Puis, avec la poursuite des guerres anglo-espagnoles, Élisabeth I re autorisa de nouvelles attaques contre les ports espagnols aux Amériques et contre les galions transportant les richesses du Nouveau Monde en Europe [ 14 ] . Au même moment, des écrivains influents comme Richard Hakluyt et John Dee (qui fut le premier à employer le terme « d'Empire britannique ») [ 15 ] commencèrent à faire pression pour la fondation d'un empire anglais. À ce moment, l'Espagne était solidement implantée dans les Amériques, le Portugal avait établi des comptoirs commerciaux et des forts depuis les côtes de l' Afrique et du Brésil jusqu'en Chine et la France commençait à s'établir le long du fleuve Saint-Laurent, dans ce qui deviendra la Nouvelle-France [ 16 ] .

« Premier Empire britannique » (1583–1783) [ modifier | modifier le code ]

En 1578, Élisabeth I re donna des lettres patentes à Humphrey Gilbert pour la découverte et l'exploration des territoires outre-mer [ 17 ] . Gilbert partit donc pour les Indes occidentales avec l'intention de mener des actes de piraterie et d'établir une colonie en Amérique du Nord mais l'expédition échoua avant même d'avoir franchi l'Atlantique [ 18 ] , [ 19 ] En 1583, il débarqua à Terre-Neuve dont il revendiqua la souveraineté au nom de la couronne anglaise, même s'il n'avait pas laissé de colons sur place. Gilbert ne survécut pas au voyage de retour et la reine accorda des lettres patentes à son demi-frère, Walter Raleigh, en 1584. La même année, celui-ci fonda la colonie de Roanoke, sur la côte de l'actuelle Caroline du Nord mais le manque de provisions entraina la perte de la colonie [ 20 ] .

En 1603, Jacques I er d'Angleterre monta sur le trône et, l'année suivante, il négocia le traité de Londres qui mettait fin aux hostilités avec l'Espagne. Dorénavant en paix avec son principal rival, l'Angleterre se concentra sur la construction de son propre empire colonial au lieu de s'attaquer aux colonies étrangères [ 21 ] . L'Empire britannique commença à prendre forme au début du XVII e  siècle avec la création d'implantations en Amérique du Nord et dans les Caraïbes et la fondation des premières compagnies commerciales, dont la plus notable fut la Compagnie anglaise des Indes orientales, afin d'administrer les colonies et de développer le commerce avec la métropole. Cette période, qui dura jusqu'à la perte des Treize colonies après la Guerre d'indépendance des États-Unis vers la fin du XVIII e  siècle, est désignée par l'expression « Premier Empire britannique » [ 22 ] .

Amérique, Afrique et commerce triangulaire [ modifier | modifier le code ]

Articles détaillés : Colonisation britannique des Amériques, Amérique du Nord britannique et Treize Colonies.

Les possessions dans les Caraïbes représentaient initialement les colonies anglaises les plus importantes et les plus lucratives [ 23 ] mais leur création avait été difficile. Une tentative pour implanter une colonie en Guyane en 1604 ne dura que deux ans et ne parvint pas à découvrir les gisements d'or qui avaient motivé sa création [ 24 ] . Les colonies de St. Lucia (1605) et de Grenade (1609) déclinèrent rapidement mais d'autres implantations à St. Kitts (1624), Barbade (1627) et Niévès (1628) eurent plus de succès [ 25 ] . Elles adoptèrent rapidement le système des plantations de sucre, développé par les Portugais au Brésil, qui reposait sur l'esclavage [ 26 ] . Initialement, le commerce était assuré par des navires hollandais qui transportaient les esclaves d'Afrique et acheminaient le sucre américain jusqu'en Europe. Pour s'assurer que les importants revenus de ce commerce se fassent au profit des Anglais, le parlement décréta que seuls les navires anglais auraient le droit de commercer avec les colonies anglaises. Cela entraina une série de guerres avec les Provinces-Unies tout au long du XVII e  siècle qui permirent à l'Angleterre de renforcer sa position en Amérique aux dépens des Pays-Bas [ 27 ] . En 1655, l'Angleterre annexa l'île de la Jamaïque appartenant à l'Espagne et, en 1666, elle s'implanta avec succès dans les Bahamas [ 28 ] .

Carte des colonies britanniques en Amérique du Nord vers 1776

La première colonie anglaise permanente établie en Amérique fut créée à Jamestown en 1607 par John Smith sous l'impulsion de la Virginia Company. Les Bermudes furent revendiquées par l'Angleterre en 1609 lorsque le navire amiral de la Virginia Company y fit naufrage et, en 1615, elles furent accordées à la nouvelle Somers Isles Company [ 29 ] . La charte de la Virginia Company fut révoquée en 1624 et un contrôle direct de la Virginie fut assumé par la Couronne britannique, ce qui permit la fondation de la colonie de Virginie [ 30 ] . La colonie de Terre-Neuve fut créée en 1610 avec l'objectif d'implanter des peuplements permanents sur l'ile [ 31 ] . En 1620, Plymouth fut créée en tant que refuge pour les puritains anglais [ 32 ] . D'autres colonies furent progressivement fondées le long de la côte atlantique : Le Maryland en 1634, le Rhode Island en 1636, le Connecticut en 1639 et la province de Caroline en 1663. Après la chute de Fort Amsterdam en 1664, l'Angleterre s'empara de la colonie hollandaise de Nouvelle-Néerlande, qui fut renommée New York. Cette annexion fut formalisée par le traité de Bréda dans lequel les Provinces-Unies échangeaient la Nouvelle-Néerlande contre le Suriname [ 33 ] . En 1681, la province de Pennsylvanie fut fondée par William Penn. Les colonies américaines étaient moins profitables que les colonies sucrières des Caraïbes mais elle disposaient de vastes étendues de terres et attiraient massivement les émigrants anglais [ 34 ] .

En 1670, Charles II d'Angleterre accorda une charte à la Compagnie de la Baie d'Hudson qui lui offrait le monopole sur le commerce des fourrures dans la Terre de Rupert, une vaste étendue recouvrant une large part du Canada actuel. Les forts et les comptoirs commerciaux créés par la Compagnie étaient régulièrement la cible d'attaques des Français qui pratiquaient également le commerce des fourrures depuis la Nouvelle-France [ 35 ] .

Deux ans plus tard, la Royal African Company fut créée et reçut le monopole de l'approvisionnement en esclaves des colonies anglaises dans les Caraïbes [ 36 ] . Dès le départ, l'esclavage était la base de l'Empire britannique dans les Indes occidentales. Jusqu'à son abolition en 1807, la Grande-Bretagne fut responsable de la déportation de près de 3,5 millions d'Africains vers l'Amérique, soit un tiers de tous ceux victimes du Commerce triangulaire [ 37 ] . Pour faciliter ce commerce, des forts furent établis sur les côtes de l'Afrique de l'Ouest comme à l'île James, à Jamestown et à l'île de Bunce. Dans les Caraïbes britanniques, le pourcentage de Noirs dans la population passa de 25 % en 1650 à environ 80 % en 1780 et dans les Treize colonies, le nombre passa de 10 % à 40 % sur la même période (la majorité se trouvant dans les colonies du sud) [ 38 ] . Pour les commerçants européens, le commerce était extrêmement profitable et devint la base de l'économie pour de nombreuses villes comme Bristol ou Liverpool, qui formaient le troisième angle du commerce triangulaire avec l'Afrique et l'Amérique. Les conditions épouvantables du voyage faisaient qu'un esclave sur sept mourait lors de la traversée de l'Atlantique [ 39 ] .

En 1695, le parlement écossais accorda une charte à la Company of Scotland qui fonda une colonie dans l'isthme de Panama en 1698 avec l'ambition de construire un canal dans la région. Assiégée par les colons espagnols de Nouvelle-Grenade et décimée par la malaria, elle fut abandonnée deux ans plus tard. Le projet Darién fut un désastre économique pour l'Écosse et mit fin aux ambitions écossaises de rivaliser avec l'Angleterre dans l'aventure coloniale [ 40 ] . L'épisode eut également de larges répercussions politiques car il convainquit les gouvernements écossais et anglais des mérites d'une union des deux pays au lieu d'une simple union des couronnes [ 41 ] . En 1707, l'Écosse était intégrée au sein du Royaume de Grande-Bretagne après l'Acte d'Union.

Rivalité avec les Pays-Bas en Asie [ modifier | modifier le code ]

Le Fort St. George fut fondé à Madras en 1639

À la fin du XVI e  siècle, l'Angleterre et les Pays-Bas commencèrent à menacer le monopole portugais pour le commerce avec l'Asie en formant des sociétés par actions pour financer les expéditions. La Compagnie anglaise des Indes orientales et la Compagnie néerlandaise des Indes orientales furent respectivement fondées en 1600 et en 1602. L'objectif principal était de participer au prospère commerce des épices en s'implantant là où elles étaient produites. Les trois nations furent quelque temps en compétition pour la suprématie commerciale dans la région [ 42 ] , mais le système financier plus avancé des Pays-Bas [ 43 ] et leurs victoires dans les trois Guerres anglo-néerlandaises du XVII e  siècle leur permirent d'obtenir une position dominante en Asie. Les hostilités cessèrent après la Glorieuse Révolution de 1688 qui vit Guillaume III d'Orange, stathouder des Provinces-Unies, devenir roi d'Angleterre. Un accord entre les deux nations laisse le commerce des épices aux Pays-Bas et le commerce des textiles à l'Angleterre. Cependant, le commerce du thé et du coton supplante rapidement le commerce des épices et en 1720, la Compagnie anglaise, aidée par la puissante Royal Navy, commence à prendre le dessus sur la Compagnie néerlandaise [ 43 ] .

Lutte mondiale contre la France [ modifier | modifier le code ]

Défaite des navires français à Québec en 1759

Au début du XVIII e  siècle, avec la stagnation de l'Empire espagnol et le déclin de la puissance hollandaise, le Royaume-Uni devenait la puissance coloniale dominante. Néanmoins, la France fut sa grande rivale tout au long du siècle [ 44 ] .

La mort de Charles II d'Espagne en 1700 et sa succession par Philippe d'Anjou, un petit-fils de Louis XIV de France, laissait présager une unification de l'Espagne, de la France et de leurs colonies respectives, une possibilité inacceptable pour l'Angleterre et les autres puissances européennes [ 45 ] . En 1701, l'Angleterre, le Portugal et les Pays-Bas s'allièrent au Saint-Empire romain germanique contre la France et l'Espagne lors de la Guerre de Succession d'Espagne qui dura jusqu'en 1714. Lors du Traité d'Utrecht, qui mit fin à la guerre, Philippe renonça à ses droits de succession au trône de France [ 45 ] . L'Empire britannique reçut Gibraltar et Minorque de la part de l'Espagne, l'Acadie de la part de la France et sa domination sur Terre-Neuve fut renforcée. De plus, la Grande-Bretagne obtint le monopole sur l' asiento qui désigne la fourniture d'esclaves à l'Amérique Latine. Gibraltar, qui reste un territoire britannique aujourd'hui, devint une base navale stratégique et permit au Royaume-Uni de contrôler l'entrée et la sortie de la Méditerranée [ 46 ] .

La Guerre de Sept Ans, qui débuta en 1756, fut le premier conflit d'envergure mondiale car les combats eurent lieu en Europe, en Inde et en Amérique du Nord. Le Traité de Paris de 1763 eut des conséquences immenses pour le futur de l'Empire britannique. En Amérique du Nord, la France abandonna ses revendications sur la Terre de Rupert [ 35 ] , céda la Nouvelle-France (et une importante population francophone) à la Grande-Bretagne et la Louisiane à l'Espagne. L'Espagne céda la Floride à la Grande-Bretagne. En Inde, la Guerre carnatique laissait seulement à la France le contrôle de ses comptoirs commerciaux (mais avec des restrictions militaires) et surtout mettait fin aux espoirs français de dominer le sous-continent [ 47 ] . La défaite de la France et la destruction de son empire colonial à la suite de la Guerre de Sept Ans firent de la Grande-Bretagne la première puissance maritime au monde [ 48 ] .

Ascension du « Second Empire britannique » (1783–1815) [ modifier | modifier le code ]

La victoire de Robert Clive lors de la Bataille de Plassey annonça le début de la domination britannique en Inde.

Règne de la Compagnie en Inde [ modifier | modifier le code ]

Durant son premier siècle d'existence, la Compagnie anglaise des Indes orientales se concentra sur le commerce avec le sous-continent indien car elle n'était pas en position de rivaliser avec le puissant Empire moghol qui lui avait accordé des droits commerciaux en 1617 [ 49 ] . La situation évolua au XVIII e  siècle avec le déclin des Moghols et la Compagnie anglaise des Indes orientales affronta son équivalent français, la Compagnie française des Indes orientales durant les Guerres carnatiques lors des années 1740 et 1750. La Bataille de Plassey de 1757, qui vit la victoire des Britanniques menés par Robert Clive sur le Bengale et ses alliés français, permit à la Compagnie de devenir la puissance militaire et politique dominante en Inde [ 50 ] . Dans les décennies qui suivirent, elle s'empara progressivement de nombreux territoires qu'elle administrait soit directement soit par l'intermédiaire des dirigeants locaux. Elle organisa sa propre armée principalement composée de cipayes indiens [ 51 ] . L'Inde britannique devint finalement la plus profitable des possessions britanniques, le « joyau de la couronne », et permit au Royaume-Uni de s'élever au rang de plus puissante nation au monde [ 52 ] .

Perte des Treize colonies américaines [ modifier | modifier le code ]

Article détaillé : Révolution américaine. Reddition de Cornwallis à Yorktown . La perte des colonies américaines marquaient la fin du « premier Empire britannique ».

Au cours des années 1760 et 1770, les relations entre la Grande-Bretagne et les Treize colonies se détériorèrent en particulier du fait de la volonté du parlement britannique de taxer les colons américains sans leur accord [ 53 ] . En effet, les colons n'étaient pas représentés au parlement de Westminster. Le mécontentement déclencha la Révolution américaine et la Guerre d'indépendance des États-Unis en 1775. L'année suivante, les colons proclamèrent leur indépendance. Avec l'aide de la France, de l'Espagne et des Pays-Bas, les États-Unis gagnèrent la guerre en 1783.

La perte des Treize colonies, à l'époque la possession la plus peuplée de la Grande-Bretagne, est considérée par les historiens comme l'événement marquant la transition entre le « premier » et le « second » empire [ 54 ] au cours de laquelle le Royaume-Uni se détourne de l'Amérique au profit de l'Asie, de l'Afrique et du Pacifique. Dans son ouvrage La Richesse des Nations , publié en 1776, l'économiste Adam Smith avançait que les colonies étaient superflues et que le libre-échange allait remplacer les politiques mercantilistes qui avaient caractérisé la première période de l'expansion coloniale [ 48 ] , [ 55 ] . L'augmentation du commerce entre les États-Unis et le Royaume-Uni après 1783 semblait confirmer l'idée de Smith selon laquelle le contrôle politique n'était pas nécessaire au succès économique [ 56 ] , [ 57 ] . Les tensions entre les deux nations s'aggravèrent toutefois lors des Guerres napoléoniennes car la Grande-Bretagne tentait de couper le commerce américain avec la France et arraisonnait les navires américains à la recherche de déserteurs. Les États-Unis déclenchèrent la Guerre de 1812 mais aucun des deux camps ne parvint à prendre l'ascendant sur l'autre. Le Traité de Gand de 1815 confirma donc les frontières d'avant-guerre [ 58 ] .

Les événements en Amériques influencèrent la politique britannique dans la province de Québec où entre 40 000 et 100 000 [ 59 ] loyalistes avaient fui après la perte des Treize colonies [ 60 ] . Les 14 000 loyalistes qui s'installèrent dans les vallées de la Sainte-Croix et du Saint-Jean, faisant alors partie de la Nouvelle-Écosse, étaient mécontents d'être gouvernés depuis le gouvernement provincial de Halifax. Londres détacha alors le Nouveau-Brunswick de la Nouvelle-Écosse en 1784 pour en faire une colonie séparée [ 61 ] . L'Acte constitutionnel de 1791 créait les provinces du Haut-Canada (principalement anglophone) et du Bas-Canada (principalement francophone) pour apaiser les tensions entre les deux communautés et implanter un système de gouvernement similaire à celui utilisé en Grande-Bretagne avec l'intention de renforcer l'autorité impériale et de ne pas laisser une sorte de contrôle populaire du gouvernement qui avait été accusé d'avoir mené à la Révolution américaine [ 62 ] .

Exploration du Pacifique [ modifier | modifier le code ]

James Cook avait pour mission de découvrir le continent sud Terra Australis

Depuis 1718, la déportation dans les colonies américaines était la peine pour divers actes criminels en Grande-Bretagne et environ un millier de condamnés étaient exilés en Amérique chaque année [ 63 ] . À la suite de l'indépendance des Treize colonies, le gouvernement britannique se tourna vers l'Australie [ 64 ] . La côte occidentale de l'Australie avait été explorée pour la première fois par l'explorateur hollandais Willem Janszoon en 1606 et fut nommée Nouvelle-Hollande par la Compagnie néerlandaise des Indes orientales [ 65 ] mais aucune tentative de colonisation ne fut entreprise. En 1770, James Cook explora la côte orientale de l'Australie lors d'un voyage scientifique dans le Pacifique Sud et revendiqua la Nouvelle-Galles du Sud au nom du Royaume-Uni [ 66 ] . En 1778, Joseph Banks, le botaniste de l'expédition de Cook convainquit le gouvernement britannique de la possibilité d'établir une colonie pénitentiaire à Botany Bay et les premiers condamnés arrivèrent en 1788 [ 67 ] . La Grande-Bretagne continua à exiler des condamnés en Nouvelle-Galles du Sud jusqu'en 1840 [ 68 ] . Les colonies australiennes devinrent rentables grâce aux exportations de laine et d'or [ 69 ] . Les ruées vers l'or eurent principalement lieu dans la colonie de Victoria et firent de la capitale Melbourne l'une des villes les plus riches du monde [ 70 ] et la deuxième plus grande ville de l'Empire britannique après Londres [ 71 ] .

Durant son voyage, Cook explora également la Nouvelle-Zélande, explorée pour la première fois par l'explorateur hollandais Abel Tasman en 1642. Cook revendiqua l'Île du Nord et l'Île du Sud au nom de la Couronne britannique respectivement en 1769 et en 1770. Initialement, les interaction entre les indigènes maoris et les Européens se limitèrent à l'échange de biens. Les implantations européennes s'étendirent rapidement durant les premières décennies du XIX e principalement dans l'Île du Nord. En 1839, la Compagnie de Nouvelle-Zélande annonça son intention d'acheter de larges bandes de terres et d'établir des colonies en Nouvelle-Zélande. Le 6 février 1840, le capitaine William Hobson et environ quarante chefs maoris signent le Traité de Waitangi qui est considéré comme l'acte fondateur de la Nouvelle-Zélande [ 72 ] , [ 73 ] . Cependant les différentes interprétations du texte suivant les versions britanniques ou maories [ 74 ] entrainèrent des tensions qui culminèrent lors des guerres maories et le traité reste encore aujourd'hui un sujet de débat [ 75 ] .

Guerre avec la France napoléonienne [ modifier | modifier le code ]

Article détaillé : Guerres napoléoniennes. La Bataille de Waterloo mit un terme au règne de Napoléon I er .

Le Royaume-Uni investit des ressources considérables pour vaincre la France napoléonienne, mais en vain. Le Royaume-Uni organise de nombreuses coalitions qui se font écraser. Incapable de rivaliser avec la puissance française en Europe continentale, la Grande-Bretagne se concentra sur le contrôle des mers. Les ports français furent mis sous blocus par la Royal Navy qui remporta une victoire décisive sur la flotte franco-espagnole à Trafalgar en 1805. Les colonies des autres puissances européennes furent occupées, dont celles des Pays-Bas qui avaient été annexés par Napoléon I er en 1810. La France fut finalement battue par la 6 e  coalition des armées européennes en 1815 [ 76 ] . Les traités de paix furent à nouveau en faveur de la Grande-Bretagne : la France cédait les îles Ioniennes, l'Île Maurice, Sainte-Lucie et Tobago ; l'Espagne cédait Trinidad ; Les Pays-Bas abandonnaient la Guyane, la Colonie du Cap et Ceylan et l'ordre de Saint-Jean de Jérusalem ne recouvre pas Malte. De son côté, le Royaume-Uni rendait la Guadeloupe, la Martinique, la Guyane et La Réunion à la France et Java et le Suriname aux Pays-Bas [ 77 ] .

Empire britannique en 1815

Abolition de l'esclavage [ modifier | modifier le code ]

Article connexe : Abolition de l'esclavage au Royaume-Uni.

Sous la pression du mouvement abolitionniste, le gouvernement britannique fait passer le Slave Trade Act de 1807 qui met fin au commerce des esclaves dans l'Empire. En 1808, la Sierra Leone est désignée pour accueillir les esclaves libérés [ 78 ] . Le Slavery Abolition Act de 1833 met fin à l'esclavage dans l'Empire britannique à l'exception de Sainte-Hélène, de Ceylan et des territoires administrés par la Compagnie anglaise des Indes orientales même si ces exemptions furent par la suite supprimées. D'après l'Acte, les esclaves étaient totalement émancipés après une période d'« apprentissage » de 4 à 6 ans [ 79 ] .

Apogée de l'Empire (1815–1914) [ modifier | modifier le code ]

L'Inde britannique en 1909 Carte de l'Empire britannique en 1886

Entre 1815 et 1914, une période désignée par le « siècle impérial britannique » par certains historiens [ 80 ] , [ 81 ] , environ 26 000 000 km 2 de territoires et environ 400 millions de personnes furent intégrés dans l'Empire [ 82 ] . La défaite de Napoléon laissait la Grande-Bretagne sans réel opposant, à l'exception de la Russie en Asie centrale [ 83 ] . Dominant les mers, le Royaume-Uni adopta un rôle de policier du monde dans ce qui sera désigné par l'expression de Pax Britannica [ 84 ] et une politique étrangère connue sous le nom de « splendide isolement » [ 85 ] . En plus du contrôle formel qu'il exerçait sur ses propres colonies, la position dominante du Royaume-Uni dans le commerce mondial faisait qu'il contrôlait les économies de nombreux pays comme la Chine, l'Argentine ou le Siam, ce qui a été désigné par certains historiens comme un « empire informel » [ 86 ] , [ 87 ] .

La puissance impériale britannique était soutenue par les bateaux à vapeur et le télégraphe, deux technologies développées dans la seconde moitié du XIX e  siècle qui permettaient à la Grande-Bretagne de contrôler et de défendre son empire. À partir de 1902, les possessions de l'Empire britannique étaient reliées par un réseau de câbles télégraphiques connus sous le nom de «  All Red Line  » [ 88 ] .

Expansion en Asie [ modifier | modifier le code ]

Article connexe : Raj britannique. Caricature politique de 1876 montrant Benjamin Disraeli couronner la reine Victoria impératrice des Indes. L'image titre New crowns for old ones

La Compagnie anglaise des Indes orientales mena l'expansion de l'Empire britannique en Asie. L'armée de la Compagnie aida l'armée britannique dans la capture de Singapour (1819), de Malacca (1824), qui furent intégrés au sein des Établissements des détroits, et de la Birmanie (1826) [ 83 ] .

Depuis ses possessions en Inde, la Compagnie était également engagée dans le très lucratif commerce de l'opium avec la Chine depuis les années 1730. Ce commerce, illégal depuis son interdiction par la Dynastie Qing en 1729, permit d'inverser le déséquilibre de la balance commerciale résultant des importations britanniques de thé qui voyait de grandes quantités d'argent être transférées de Grande-Bretagne en Chine [ 89 ] . En 1839, la saisie de plus de 1 000 tonnes d'opium par les autorités chinoises de Canton entraina la déclaration de guerre du Royaume-Uni. La Première guerre de l'opium s'acheva par une victoire britannique qui obtint Hong Kong, alors une implantation mineure, d'après les termes du Traité de Nankin [ 90 ] .

En 1857, une mutinerie de cipayes, soldats indiens intégrés dans l'armée britannique, dégénéra en un large conflit [ 91 ] . Le Royaume-Uni mit six mois pour venir à bout de la révolte qui causa de lourdes pertes dans les deux camps. Par la suite, un gouverneur-général fut nommé par le gouvernement britannique pour administrer le Raj britannique et la reine Victoria fut couronnée Impératrice des Indes en 1876. La Compagnie des Indes orientales fut dissoute en 1858 [ 92 ] .

L'Inde connut une série de mauvaises récoltes dans la seconde moitié du XIX e  siècle qui entrainèrent de graves famines au cours desquelles environ 15 millions de personnes moururent. La Compagnie n'avait pas mis en place des politiques coordonnées pour gérer ces famines durant sa période de contrôle. Cela évolua sous le Raj car des commissions étaient mises en place après chaque famine pour en étudier les causes et mettre en place de nouvelles politiques qui ne furent cependant pas efficaces avant le début du XX e  siècle [ 93 ] .

Rivalité avec la Russie [ modifier | modifier le code ]

Article détaillé : Grand Jeu (géostratégie).

Durant le XIX e  siècle, la Grande-Bretagne et la Russie s'affrontèrent pour combler le vide laissé par le déclin des empires ottoman, perse et chinois. Cette rivalité fut désignée par l'expression « Grand Jeu » [ 94 ] . Après les défaites infligées par la Russie à l'Empire ottoman et à la Perse à la fin des années 1830, la Grande-Bretagne s'inquiéta d'une possible menace sur l'Inde [ 95 ] . En 1839, le Royaume-Uni tente de s'en prémunir en envahissant l'Afghanistan mais la première guerre anglo-afghane se termina par un désastre [ 96 ] . Lorsque la Russie envahit la Roumanie ottomane en 1853, les peurs concernant un possible effondrement de l'Empire ottoman et une domination russe de la mer Méditerranée et du Moyen-Orient poussèrent le Royaume-Uni et à la France à envahir la péninsule de Crimée pour détruire les capacités navales russes [ 96 ] . La guerre de Crimée, qui fut le seul conflit mené par le Royaume-Uni contre une autre puissance impériale lors de la période de la Pax Britannica , fut une défaite sans appel pour la Russie [ 96 ] . La situation restait cependant non résolue en Asie centrale et tandis que la Grande-Bretagne annexait le Balouchistan en 1876, la Russie s'emparait du Kirghizistan, du Kazakhstan et du Turkménistan en 1877. Une guerre semblait inévitable mais les deux pays parvinrent à un accord sur les sphères d'influences respectives dans la région en 1878 et les tensions restantes furent résolues par la signature de l'Entente anglo-russe de 1907 [ 97 ] .

Du Cap au Caire [ modifier | modifier le code ]

Le Colosse de Rhodes , une caricature de Cecil Rhodes annonçant les plans d’une ligne de télégraphe du Cap au Caire.

La Compagnie hollandaise des Indes orientales avait fondé la Colonie du Cap à la pointe sud de l'Afrique, en 1652, comme station de relai pour les navires effectuant le voyage entre les Provinces-Unies et les Indes orientales néerlandaises. Le Royaume-Uni annexa formellement la colonie, et sa large population afrikaner (ou boer) en 1806 après l'avoir occupée en 1795 à la suite de l'invasion des Pays-Bas par la France [ 98 ] . L'immigration britannique commença dans les années 1820 et mécontenta les boers qui fondèrent des républiques indépendantes dans le nord à la suite du Grand Trek à la fin des années 1830 [ 99 ] . Au cours de leur migration, les voortrekkers s'opposèrent aux britanniques, qui avait leur propre politique d'expansion coloniale en Afrique du Sud et avec les populations noires comme les nations basotho ou zoulou. Finalement les boers fondèrent deux républiques viables : la République sud-africaine du Transvaal (1852-1902) et l'État libre d'Orange (1854-1902) [ 100 ] . En 1902, les britanniques annexèrent les deux républiques à la suite de la Seconde guerre des Boers de 1899-1902 [ 101 ] .

En 1869, le canal de Suez promu par Napoléon III fut ouvert et reliait la Méditerranée à l'Océan Indien. Les britanniques s'étaient initialement opposés à sa construction [ 102 ] mais une fois ouvert sa valeur stratégique fut rapidement reconnue. En 1875, le premier ministre britannique Benjamin Disraeli racheta les parts égyptiennes dans le canal pour 4 000 000£ (210 millions de livres de 2011). Le contrôle financier anglo-français sur l'Égypte pris fin en 1882 avec l'occupation du pays par le Royaume-Uni après une guerre rapide [ 103 ] . Les Français, majoritaires dans les parts du canal tentèrent d'affaiblir la position britannique [ 104 ] mais un compromis est trouvé en 1888 avec la Convention de Constantinople qui confirme la neutralité du canal [ 105 ] .

Comme les activités coloniales des français, des belges et des portugais dans le bassin du Congo entrainaient des tensions entre les différent pays, la conférence de Berlin de 1884 fut organisée pour réglementer la compétition dans ce qui fut appelé le « partage de l'Afrique » [ 106 ] . Le partage continua jusque dans les années 1890 et poussa le Royaume-Uni à reconsidérer sa décision de se retirer du Soudan en 1885. Une force combinée anglo-égyptienne battit l'armée mahdiste en 1896 et repoussa une tentative française d'annexion de la région du Haut-Nil à Fachoda en 1898. Le Soudan devint un condominium anglo-égyptien, un protectorat conjoint dans le nom mais une colonie britannique dans les faits [ 107 ] .

Les acquisitions britanniques en Afrique orientale et australe poussèrent Cecil Rhodes, pionnier de l'expansion britannique à demander la création d'un chemin de fer Le Cap – Le Caire permettant une meilleure administration et un transport plus facile des ressources et des hommes entre les différentes colonies [ 108 ] . En 1888, Rhodes et sa compagnie privée, la British South Africa Company, occupèrent et annexèrent des territoires qui furent baptisés en son honneur, la Rhodésie [ 109 ] .

Exploration de l'Ouest nord-américain [ modifier | modifier le code ]

Le Royaume-Uni étendit également son Empire jusqu'à la région Nord-Ouest Pacifique sur le continent nord-américain. Après l'établissement du Columbia District et de l'Oregon Country qui servirent de zone de traite des fourrures, des colonies permanentes ont été établis dans la région en raison de la ruée vers l'or qui fut un véritable boom économique. La première colonie créée fut la colonie de l'Île de Vancouver en 1846. Elle fut suivie par l'établissement de la colonie de la Colombie-Britannique en 1858, le Territoire du Nord-Ouest en 1859, le territoire Stikine en 1862, puis enfin par la colonie des Îles de la Reine-Charlotte en 1863. La colonie de Colombie-Britannique connut une rapide expansion de son territoire, en raison de l'absorption des Îles de la Reine-Charlotte et du territoire Stikine en 1863, puis de l'Île de Vancouver en 1866.

Indépendance des colonies blanches [ modifier | modifier le code ]



these things either. [Mowatt-Larson, 1/2010 pdf file]
Jdey's 9/11 Connection - In late 1999, Jdey may have attended an advanced training course in Afghanistan also attended by 9/11 hijackers Khalid Almihdhar and Nawaf Alhazmi (see Cole Bomber and Other Militants')" onmouseout="return nd()">Late 1999). He may also have been instructed by 9/11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed at the same time as hijacker Mohamed Atta and Ramzi bin-al-Shibh. A letter recovered from a safe house in Afghanistan in late 2001, apparently written by al-Qaeda leader Saif al-Adel, says that Jdey was originally meant to be one of the 9/11 hijackers. A videotape of Jdey pledging to be a martyr was also discovered in mid-November 2001 in Afghanistan, in the wreckage of al-Qaeda leader Mohammed Atef’s house (see November 15-Late December 2001). [9/11 Commission, 7/24/2004, pp. 527]
Jdey Is Highly Wanted After 9/11 - Jdey was born in Tunisia, but became a Canadian citizen in the mid-1990s. After 9/11, it is known that he leaves Canada in November 2001. In January 2002, the US government will announce they are seeking him. In 2005, the FBI will announce a $5 million reward for him. [Los Angeles Times, 1/26/2002; CBC News, 5/27/2004; Rewards for Justice, 4/2005]

canada géna usa

goose jackets
canada goose sverige
chilliwack bomber canada goose
foto d'oca
Canada Goose Jacks

Empire britannique

Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Aller à : navigation, rechercher Si ce bandeau n'est plus pertinent, retirez-le. Cliquez pour voir d'autres modèles. Cet article ne respecte pas la neutralité de point de vue  (indiquez la date de pose grâce au paramètre date ) .

Considérez son contenu avec précaution et/ou discutez-en. Il est possible dexxMr=7Ltilisant {{section non neutre}} et de souligner les passages problématiques avec {{passage non neutre}}.

Empire britannique
British Empire ( en )

XVI e  siècle- XX e  siècle

Drapeau
Union Flag

Hymne : God Save the Queen

Description de cette image, également commentée ci-après Les zones du monde qui firent à une époque partie de l'Empire britannique. Les actuels territoires britanniques d'outre-mer sont soulignés en rouge. Informations générales Statut Monarchie parlementaire Capitale Londres Langue Anglais et langues locales Religion Anglicanisme, protestantisme et religions locales Monnaie Livre sterling Démographie Population 1939 [ 1 ] , [ 2 ] 450 000 000 hab. Superficie Superficie 1939 [ 1 ] , [ 2 ] 33 000 000   km 2 (ensemble) 26 000 000   km 2 Histoire et événements 1600 Monopole de la Compagnie des Indes dans l'océan Indien. 1607 Jamestown est la première colonie américaine. 1707 L'Acte d'Union est signé. 1770 James Cook arrive en Australie. 1791 L'Acte constitutionnel instaure le Haut et le Bas-Canada. 1815 Les Britanniques s'imposent contre Napoléon. 1837 La reine Victoria commence son règne. 1882 Le Canal de Suez passe sous contrôle britannique. 1914 L'Empire se bat au côté de la Triple-Entente. 1921 L'État libre d'Irlande est formé. 1997 Le Royaume-Uni cède Hong Kong à la République Populaire de Chine

Entités précédentes :

Entités suivantes :

L’Empire britannique ou Empire colonial britannique était un ensemble territorial composé des dominions, colonies, protectorats, mandats et autres territoires gouvernés ou administrés par le Royaume-Uni [ 3 ] . Il trouve son origine dans les comptoirs commerciaux puis les colonies outre-mer établis très progressivement par l'Angleterre, à partir de la fin du XVI e  siècle. Elle était la première puissance mondiale [ 4 ] à son apogée en 1922, avec un quart de la population mondiale, soit environ 400 millions d'habitants [ 5 ] et s'étendait sur 29,8 millions de km² (environ 22 % des terres émergées) [ 6 ] , [ 7 ] . En conséquence, son héritage dans les domaines de la politique, du droit, de la linguistique et de la culture est colossal.

Au cours de l'Âge des découvertes aux XV e et XVI e siècles, le Portugal et l'Espagne fondèrent de vastes empires. Envieux des richesses conférées par ces empires, l'Angleterre, la France et les Pays-Bas commencèrent à établir des colonies et des comptoirs commerciaux en Amérique et en Asie [ 8 ] . Une série de guerres avec la France plaça l'Amérique du Nord sous le contrôle de l'Angleterre, juste avant la perte des Treize colonies en 1783 après la guerre d'indépendance des États-Unis. L'attention britannique se tourna alors vers l'Afrique, l'Asie et le Pacifique. À la suite de la défaite de la France napoléonienne en 1815, la Grande-Bretagne connut un siècle de domination sans partage et étendit ses possessions dans le monde entier. Elle accorda des degrés divers d'autonomie aux colonies blanches dont certaines devinrent des dominions.

La montée en puissance de l'Allemagne et des États-Unis éroda la domination économique britannique vers la fin du XIX e  siècle. Les tensions économiques et militaires entre la Grande-Bretagne et l'Allemagne furent l'une des causes majeures de la Première Guerre mondiale, au cours de laquelle le Royaume-Uni fit largement appel à son empire. Le conflit ruina le pays, dont l'économie fut distancée par ses voisins dans l'après-guerre, et si l'empire atteignit son expansion maximale, il n'avait plus la même puissance incontestée. Lors de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, les colonies britanniques d'Asie du Sud-Est furent occupées par le Japon, ce qui porta atteinte au prestige britannique et accéléra le déclin de l'empire malgré la défaite finale du Japon. Les Indes, possession la plus importante et la plus peuplée, obtinrent leur indépendance deux ans après la guerre.

Après la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, dans le cadre des mouvements de décolonisation expérimentés par les puissances européennes, la plupart des territoires de l'Empire britannique obtinrent leur indépendance. À la même époque, en 1956, la crise de Suez, qui tourna au fiasco pour la Grande-Bretagne, symbolise sa perte de puissance face aux États-Unis notamment. L'acte final du mouvement de décolonisation fut la rétrocession de Hong Kong à la Chine en 1997. 14 territoires restent toutefois sous souveraineté britannique au sein des territoires britanniques d'outre-mer. Après leur indépendance, la plupart des anciennes colonies rejoignirent le Commonwealth of Nations , une association libre d'États indépendants. 16 nations du Commonwealth conservent le monarque britannique comme chef d'État en tant que royaumes du Commonwealth.

Sommaire